Banner: Porcelain Grace, Meryl Ruth, Fine Art

 

   LOB-STIR THE TEA, A CERAMIC TEAPOT

 

 

 

Lob-stir the Tea shown in finished form as a ceramic teapot in the form of a lobster.

  • This is another iteration in the series of stoneware clay teapots based on the lobster motif in what I call The Lobster Pot Series. It represents a further progression on the structure and design of Crus-Tea-Cean and Lobster Pot of Tea. Its design and coloration was inspired by consideration of Maine's two culinary temptations, lobster and blueberries.
  • Design modifications include a taller, less squat teapot body, a different kind of paddling, modified sculpting of the spout, repositioned claws, a more curved asymmetrical tail, a heavier braided rope handle, and newly arranged lobster legs.
  • Its base is a wheel-thrown and altered teapot to which is appended a hand-built lobster tail. The tail is formed from templates fashioned of deconstructed lobster tail segments. The claws and legs are slip cast from molds made from actual lobster parts.
  • Construction sequence:
  • Date: 2009.
  • Size: 8.0" x 9.25" x 6.0".
  • Sold to a Maine collector.

   ENLARGED VIEWS

Return to top    

Enlarged view shown.

Return to top    

Enlarged view shown.

Return to top    

Enlarged view shown.

Return to top    

Enlarged view shown.

Return to top    

Enlarged view shown.

Return to top    


   CREATIVE PROCESS

Creative process illustrated.

  • The first component of the construction phase of this piece is the formation of the teapot body and its lid by wheel throwing.
  • The lobster head, which will become the teapot's spout, is sculpted of stoneware clay and attached in place over an opening made in the side of the body.

Creative process illustrated.   

  • The stoneware teapot body is formed by wheel-throwing. It is then altered by paddling with a wooden paddle to flatten the surface in three locations, each of which is further indented with my thumb. Those three altered surfaces are to be used later for attaching the lobster's claws and tail.
  • The lobster tail is hand-built of a series of individually made clay slab segments designed from those of a deconstructed lobster tail.
  • When the tail is separately completed, it is attached to the teapot base.
  • The model I used was a frozen whole lobster that served as my inspiration in the studio. It was preserved for reuse over a long period of time by refreezing it daily at the end of a day's work.

Return to top    

Creative process illustrated.

  • The two-part claws are separately cast in clay from a mold made from lobster claws. The lobster head is sculpted to form the teapot's spout.
  • The lobster tail and head-spout are attached to the teapot body.

Return to top    

    Creative process illustrated.

     

  • Additional lobster legs are crafted by casting and applied to the art work.
  • This completes the construction phase of this piece in preparation for its first firing after is has been allowed to dry sufficiently.

Return to top    

Creative process illustrated.

  • The lobster claws, tail and legs, all individually constructed, are attached in place to form the reconstructed lobster.
  • A braided clay handle is also added to finalize the construction sequence.
  • Glazing is undertaken to provide realistic details for the lobster and a matching tablecloth for the lid.

Return to top    

Creative process illustrated.

  • After a second firing to cone 6, additional cold finishes are applied with China paint.
  • The work is completed by a final firing in an oven at 300 degrees F.

Return to top    


  DETAILED VIEWS *

Detailed views illustrated.


Click for Related Links Click for Home page Click for Site Map Click for About pages Click for Creative Process pages Click for Exhibitions pages Click for Galleries pages Click for Studio pages Click for Price List Click for Site Map